Goncalo Alves/tigerwood/jobillo

Common Name(s): Goncalo Alves, Tigerwood, Jobillo

Scientific Name: Astronium spp. (A. graveolens and A. fraxinifolium)

Distribution: From Mexico southward to Brazil

Tree Size: 100-130 ft (30-40 m) tall, 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m) trunk diameter

Average Dried Weight: 57 lbs/ft3 (905 kg/m3)

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .80, .91

Janka Hardness: 2,170 lbf (9,640 N)

Modulus of Rupture: 16,970 lbf/in2 (117.0 MPa)

Elastic Modulus: 2,401,000 lbf/in2 (16.56 GPa)

Crushing Strength: 10,770 lbf/in2 (74.2 MPa)

Shrinkage: Radial: 4.2%, Tangential: 7.8%, Volumetric: 11.2%, T/R Ratio: 1.9

Color/Appearance: Heartwood is typically a medium reddish brown with irregularly spaced streaks of dark brown to black. Color tends to darken with age.

Grain/Texture: Grain can be straight, but is usually wavy or interlocked. Fine, uniform texture with good natural luster.

Endgrain: Diffuse-porous; medium to large pores in no specific arrangement, few; solitary and radial multiples of 2-3; tyloses and other heartwood deposits common; growth rings indistinct; narrow rays visible without lens, normal spacing; parenchyma vasicentric.

Rot Resistance: Goncalo Alves has excellent weathering properties, and is rated as very durable regarding decay resistance.

Workability: Goncalo Alves is generally not too difficult to work, despite its high density. Figured pieces with irregular grain can pose a challenge in planing and machining operations. Goncalo Alves can also have a moderate blunting effect on cutters. The wood is very resistant to moisture absorption, which can make it difficult to glue. Goncalo Alves turns and finishes well.

Odor: No characteristic odor.

Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Goncalo Alves has been reported as a sensitizer. Usually most common reactions simply include eye and skin irritation. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.

Pricing/Availability: Widely available in a variety of widths and lengths as both lumber and veneer, as well as smaller craft blanks. Prices should be moderate for an imported hardwood.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Flooring, veneers, furniture, cabinetry, carving, turned objects, and other small wood specialty objects such as: pool cues, archery bows, knife handles, etc.

2 products